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EARA is recruiting for a Communications Officer

EARA COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER

  • Contract: Permanent, full-time (35 hours a week)
  • Salary: Up to £32,000, depending on experience
  • Benefits: 25 days paid holiday per year, employer contribution to pension
  • Located: Central London
  • Reports to: EARA Communications and Media Manager
  • Applications sent to Kirk Leech kleech@eara.eu

European Animal Research Association (EARA)

EARA is a communications and advocacy organisation whose mission is to uphold the interests of biomedical research and healthcare development, in the use of animals for research. EARA provides a platform, across Europe, for the public and other external stakeholders to be informed and learn about the role of animals in scientific research and the benefits and limitations. Being a European-wide membership organisation, EARA also encourages the creation and development of national networks of stakeholders and improves the co-ordination between them.

Principal duties:

Under the management of the EARA Communications and Media Manager, the principal duties will include:
Social media: Generate ideas, opportunities and content to highlight EARA’s work, ethos and areas of concern to its target audiences via EARA’s social media channels (Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube).
Website: Assist in the commissioning, writing and editing of the EARA website, the weekly EARA News Digest and the quarterly Partner Newsletter.
Media: Assist in responding to media enquiries, contribute to press releases and briefings as appropriate, conduct daily media monitoring, assist with the production of promotional materials.
Contact database: Maintain EARA’s Customer Relationship Management database.

Other duties:

Undertake other reasonable tasks, associated with a membership association, as required.

Person Specifications

 Required experience:

  • Experience of science communications, media relations, social media for business and website administration
  • Preferably an academic background in life sciences or science communications.
  • An understanding of the scientific, ethical and moral justification for animal research.
  • Excellent communication skills in English, both written and verbal.
  • Ability to work under pressure, meet deadlines, prioritise workload and maximise the use of time.

Additional desirable requirements:

Written and/or verbal competency in another European language
To be able to work occasional evenings and weekends
Willing to undertake occasional travel in Europe
Relationship Management database experience
Familiarity with the use of graphics and tools such as Photoshop, Canva etc.

Application Process:

Please email your CV and an accompanying cover letter explaining how you meet the person specification to kleech@eara.eu with the subject heading ‘EARA Communications Officer’. Please also give an indication of when you would be available to start work.

The application deadline is Thursday, 14 February, 17.00pm GMT.

Only successful applicants will be contacted.

Germany statistics on 2017 animal use released

The total number of animals used in research in 2017 in Germany was 2.8 million, a similar level to 2015 and 2016, the latest figures reveal.

Germany is second only to the UK in its use of animals – in 2014, the total used was 3.3 million.

The figures, sent to the European Commission, show the vast majority of animals involved in the tests were rodents – 1.37 million mice and 255,000 rats.

Among other figures provided by the Ministry of Agriculture, 3,300 dogs and 718 cats were also used. 

German media focused (and in German) also on the rise in experiments using monkeys – up to 3,472 from 2,462 in the previous year.

Agriculture Minister Julia Klöckner, was quoted as saying: “I want the number of experiments on animals to be continuously reduced. Animals are fellow creatures and they deserve our sympathy.”

Speakers announced for free EARA event in Frankfurt

A full list of speakers is now available for the next in a series of science communications events to be held at the Max Planck Institute for Brain Research, in Frankfurt am Main, on 17 December..

The free event (register here) will discuss improving openness and communications with the general public, political decision makers and opinion formers.

Hosted by EARA and supported by the Federation of European Neuroscience Societies (FENS) and the Society for Neuroscience, the event is entitled, Improving Openness in Animal Research in Germany.

The event will focus on why scientists, researchers, press officers and other stakeholders should talk about animal research, but it will not be a debate about the ethics of animal experimentation.

The speakers are:
– Prof. Dr. Gilles Laurent, Director, Max Planck Institute for Brain Research (MPI)
– Kirk Leech, European Animal Research Association
– Dr. Andreas Lengeling, Max-Planck-Society
– Volker Stollorz, Science Media Center, Germany
– Moderator: Dr. Emily Northrup is the Head of the Animal Facility of the (MPI)

This will be followed by a panel discussion where they will be joined by Dr. Regina Oehler, a science editor at the Hessischer Rundfunk since 1985.

Improving Openness in Animal Research in Germany.
Monday 17 December 2018
14:00 – 17:00
(Registration begins at 13:30)
Max Planck Institute for Brain Research
Max-von-Laue-Str. 4
60438 Frankfurt am Main
Germany

Top ten UK universities for animal research announced

 A list of the ten UK universities that conduct the highest number of animal procedures has been published by Understanding Animal Research (UAR).

The statistics have been gathered from figures found on the universities’ websites as part of their ongoing commitment to transparency and openness.

The ten institutions collectively conducted over one third of all UK animal research in 2017 all have signed up to the Concordat on Openness on Animals Research.

The top three in the list are University of Oxford (236,429 procedures), University of Edinburgh (225,366) and University College London (214,570).

Wendy Jarrett, chief executive of UAR, said: “The Concordat has fostered a culture of openness at research institutions up and down the UK.

“Almost two-thirds of the university Concordat signatories provide their animal numbers openly on their websites – accounting for almost 90% of all animal research at UK universities.“

End

Spanish animal 2017 statistics shows drop in procedures

New figures released by the Spanish Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, show an overall decrease in the use of animals in biomedical research last year.

According to the official government website (in Spanish), in 2017 there were a total of 802,976 procedures involving animals, which compares to 917,986 in 2016, .

Overall this reflects a significant drop, equivalent to one-eighth of the 2016 total number, including almost halving of the number of times fish were used (from 168,746 to 85,687).

The statistics, made available annually in compliance with European law, demonstrate the continuing commitment of the Spanish biomedical sector to working responsibly with animals used for research.

Particular trends show a reduction in the number of procedures on mice, rats, pigs and, especially cephalopods⸺down from 8444 to 20. More procedures on cats (531) and dogs (1476) occurred in 2017 than in the previous year. This overall downward trend countered the way the number of procedures in Spain had previously been increasing since 2014.

Commenting on the figures, Lluis Montoliu of the National Centre for Biotechnology, Spaintweeted: ‘It must be remembered … that the use of dogs is still indispensable in the preclinical validation of innovative gene therapy treatments for diseases and that the use of non-human primates is equally essential in certain pathologies that affect us.’

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Remaining silent about the use of animals in research is a greater risk than speaking out, German audience is told

An event on communication in animal research in Germany this week has called on more scientists to step forward and raise awareness.

Attended by more than 80 members of the biomedical community, a panel of experts from research, animal welfare and the science media came together to discuss the topic, Improving Openness in Animal Research in Germany, at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), in Tübingen. The event was supported by the Federation of European Neuroscience Societies (FENS) and the Society for Neuroscience (SfN).

Setting the scene, EARA Executive Director, Kirk Leech, said that while progress had been made in Germany on communication there is still a significant reluctance within many academic institutions, and amongst scientists, towards conducting a more open and consistent dialogue with the public.

‘If you are in public research you have to expect that the general public will take an interest in what you do,’ he added.

Expanding on the theme, Nancy Erickson (pictured), qualified vet and animal welfare officer at, Freie Universität Berlin, and a member of animal research awareness group Pro-Test Germany, reminded the audience that: ‘By remaining silent we do create a space for misconceptions about animal research.

‘If you are only communicating in a defensive mode then you are in a difficult situation. When you are proactive you can use the quiet times to build trust with the public.’ Continue reading

EARA voices concerns to UK Parliament on implications of no-deal Brexit

EARA’s Brexit Taskforce has made a submission to the UK Parliament Health and Social Care Committee inquiry concerning the animal science used to develop human and veterinary medicines.

Critical to the continuing success of the biomedical sector will be the timely and efficient import/export transport of purpose-bred research animals, biological samples and vaccines.

The submission also offers concrete proposals for avoiding delays in the movement of animals and related materials.

‘Without the ability to move research animals from one country, or continent, to another, or from a breeder or supplier, to a research institution, crucial scientific research to discover new treatments may be disrupted,’ said Kirk Leech, EARA Executive Director.

Neuroscientists hit back at MEPs statement

The Federation of European Neuroscience Societies (FENS) has responded to the recent European Parliament’s Intergroup on the Welfare and Conservation of Animals statement on the use of animals in neuroscience, which claimed that, ‘Animal testing is inherently uncertain and is a misleading indicator for human trials’.

In its own response statement FENS said: ‘The value of animal-based research for wide-reaching scientific and medical advances, including in neuroscience, cannot be overstated.’

The statement, also backed by EARA, EFPIA, GIRCOR, RSB, TVV and Wellcome, continued: ‘While there is an element of uncertainty in drug-related R&D, the use of animals in neuroscience research has undoubtedly contributed to our ever-improving understanding of the human brain and important advances in the treatment of neurological diseases.’

Italian convictions prompt calls for greater openness

Three Italian animal rights activists convicted of raiding the University of Milan animal labs have received a harsher sentence from the judge following their claim that they were acting on behalf of a ‘higher justice’ for animals.

Judge Vincenzina Greco gave the trio an 18-month sentences for the raid in 2013 (also English translation).

Commenting on the verdict, Giuliano Grignaschi, secretary-general of Research4Life, said: ‘Those who oppose research on animals don’t have the widespread social support they claim.’

Grignaschi and colleagues hope to bring Italian legislation closer in line with public support for biomedical research, by pushing for what he calls ‘a gradual approach’, starting with the publication of at least one webpage with information on the rationale and goals of the research on animals in each institution, the results obtained, and the numbers of animals used.

Nobel Prize awarded for turning the immune system against cancer

This year’s Nobel Prize winners for Physiology or Medicine used animal models to develop their novel cancer therapy.

James P. Allison, of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, USA, and Tasuku Honjo, of Kyoto University, Japan, discovered in mice a way of unleashing immune cells to attack tumours by turning off the safeguards in the immune system that prevent it from attacking human tissue.

In turn, new drugs can now be developed offering hope to patients with advanced and previously untreatable cancer. Immune checkpoint therapy is already used to treat people with the most serious form of skin cancer, melanoma.

Cancer kills millions of people each year and is one of humanity’s greatest health challenges. By stimulating the inherent ability of our immune system to attack tumour cells this year’s Nobel Laureates have established an entirely new principle for cancer therapy. Continue reading